humanoidhistory
humanoidhistory:

PYRAMID FLYBY — An American B-1B bomber leads a package of coalition fighter jets over the Great Pyramids of Giza, Egypt in 1999 during joing opertaion Bright Star 99/00. Joining the B-1B were as follows: From Egypt, an F-4, F-16, Mig-21, and Alpha Jet; a Greek F-16; a French Mirage-5 and Mirage-2000; an Italian AMX; ; two U.S. Marine Corp F/A-18s and a Harrier; and a U.S. Navy F-14.

humanoidhistory:

PYRAMID FLYBY — An American B-1B bomber leads a package of coalition fighter jets over the Great Pyramids of Giza, Egypt in 1999 during joing opertaion Bright Star 99/00. Joining the B-1B were as follows: From Egypt, an F-4, F-16, Mig-21, and Alpha Jet; a Greek F-16; a French Mirage-5 and Mirage-2000; an Italian AMX; ; two U.S. Marine Corp F/A-18s and a Harrier; and a U.S. Navy F-14.

we-are-star-stuff

Here are a compilation of recordings made in space, recorded by either NASA or SETI. I don’t know, I just really like space and the sounds can be soothing. I hope that you will agree. +more masterposts 
+listenRecordings Of Earth: Recorded by NASA.Jupiter sound waves: This is the sound Jupiter emits via electromagnetic waves.Wow! signal: The Wow! Signal is a signal of unknown origin found by SETI. The signal surpirsed the founder so much, he wrote WOW! right on the paper.Jupiter’s radio Waves: These sounds, recorded by the Cassini space probe, are recordings of the radio waves of Jupiter. Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.More Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.Uranus: Voyager recording of Uranus.Mercury: These sounds were captured from an orbiting satellite from back in 1999 - 2001 I think.Pluto: Sounds of the lonely planet.Neptune: Recorded by Voyager II August 24-25, 1989.Saturn’s rings: Recorded by Voyager 2 on 25 August 1981.Sounds of the Sun: From the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) which was launched February 11, 2010.Outside the Solar System: NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft captured these sounds of interstellar space. November 2012
+bonusThe Sounds of Earth: The full five hours of the mixtape we sent out on both the Voyager probes.Voyager Photo Album: Images voyager took.USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D): Engine hum for 24 hours.

Here are a compilation of recordings made in space, recorded by either NASA or SETI. I don’t know, I just really like space and the sounds can be soothing. I hope that you will agree. +more masterposts 

+listen
Recordings Of Earth: Recorded by NASA.
Jupiter sound waves: This is the sound Jupiter emits via electromagnetic waves.
Wow! signal: The Wow! Signal is a signal of unknown origin found by SETI. The signal surpirsed the founder so much, he wrote WOW! right on the paper.
Jupiter’s radio Waves: These sounds, recorded by the Cassini space probe, are recordings of the radio waves of Jupiter. 
Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.
More Saturn’s Radio Emissions: This audio was recorded by the Cassini spacecraft picked up in April of 2002.
Uranus: Voyager recording of Uranus.
Mercury: These sounds were captured from an orbiting satellite from back in 1999 - 2001 I think.
Pluto: Sounds of the lonely planet.
Neptune: Recorded by Voyager II August 24-25, 1989.
Saturn’s rings: Recorded by Voyager 2 on 25 August 1981.
Sounds of the Sun: From the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) which was launched February 11, 2010.
Outside the Solar System: NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft captured these sounds of interstellar space. November 2012

+bonus
The Sounds of Earth: The full five hours of the mixtape we sent out on both the Voyager probes.
Voyager Photo Album: Images voyager took.
USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D): Engine hum for 24 hours.

megacosms
pennyfornasa:

On September 28th, 1980, the groundbreaking television series, Cosmos: A Personal Voyage was first broadcast on PBS, and to this day, still stands as the most watched television series that has aired on the network. Cosmos was written by Ann Druyan, Steven Soter, and Carl Sagan, who also presented the series. Carl Sagan, who was an astrophysicist and astronomer, understood the importance and influence that digital media would have on a generation, and a large number of today’s scientists and engineers have stated that watching the series at a young age greatly peaked their scientific interest and curiosity. In a recent piece on National Geographic, Patrick J. Kiger wrote:"…Sagan generally wasn’t thrilled with the portrayal of science on TV—a discontent that he got to remedy when he signed on in 1979 to develop and host Cosmos for PBS. Instead of a dull science lecture, Sagan envisioned a program that would make the fullest use of television’s visual possibilities, including special effects and computer animation, and send viewers hurtling on a spaceship between cosmic destinations, when they weren’t contemplating a “cosmic calendar” that compressed the history of the universe into the equivalent of a single Earth year. As he said at the time, his goal was to make it so that “people could turn the sound off and still enjoy the series.” The production cost a then-hefty $8 million, making it the most expensive program ever created for public television.But in the end, Sagan’s flamboyance and willingness to take risks paid off handsomely, as Cosmos became both a critical success a massive international hit. That success demonstrated that audiences would watch science, if it was presented in an entertaining fashion, and helped pave the way for generations of other science programming.”The legacy of this television series can still be felt today, as Druyan and Soter, along with producer Seth McFarlane, teammed up Neil deGrasse Tyson to carry on Carl Sagan’s passion of spreading scientific literacy to the masses.Sources: 1. Carl Sagan and the Cosmos Legacyhttp://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/cosmos-a-spacetime-odyssey/articles/carl-sagan-and-the-cosmos-legacy/

pennyfornasa:

On September 28th, 1980, the groundbreaking television series, Cosmos: A Personal Voyage was first broadcast on PBS, and to this day, still stands as the most watched television series that has aired on the network. Cosmos was written by Ann Druyan, Steven Soter, and Carl Sagan, who also presented the series. 

Carl Sagan, who was an astrophysicist and astronomer, understood the importance and influence that digital media would have on a generation, and a large number of today’s scientists and engineers have stated that watching the series at a young age greatly peaked their scientific interest and curiosity. In a recent piece on National Geographic, Patrick J. Kiger wrote:

"…Sagan generally wasn’t thrilled with the portrayal of science on TV—a discontent that he got to remedy when he signed on in 1979 to develop and host Cosmos for PBS. Instead of a dull science lecture, Sagan envisioned a program that would make the fullest use of television’s visual possibilities, including special effects and computer animation, and send viewers hurtling on a spaceship between cosmic destinations, when they weren’t contemplating a “cosmic calendar” that compressed the history of the universe into the equivalent of a single Earth year. As he said at the time, his goal was to make it so that “people could turn the sound off and still enjoy the series.” The production cost a then-hefty $8 million, making it the most expensive program ever created for public television.

But in the end, Sagan’s flamboyance and willingness to take risks paid off handsomely, as Cosmos became both a critical success a massive international hit. That success demonstrated that audiences would watch science, if it was presented in an entertaining fashion, and helped pave the way for generations of other science programming.”

The legacy of this television series can still be felt today, as Druyan and Soter, along with producer Seth McFarlane, teammed up Neil deGrasse Tyson to carry on Carl Sagan’s passion of spreading scientific literacy to the masses.

Sources: 
1. Carl Sagan and the Cosmos Legacy
http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/cosmos-a-spacetime-odyssey/articles/carl-sagan-and-the-cosmos-legacy/

larger-universe

ufo-news:



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Click Here To Send Your Free Message At Lone Signal.

Have you ever wanted to send a message in a bottle like you’ve read in books and seen in movies? Well now is your big chance. The Jamesburg earth station has been converted to send messages into deep space. These messages will…